Iowa football’s Tyler Goodson prepares for 2022 NFL Draft


The former running back has competed in both the NFL Scouting Combine and Hawkeye Pro Football Day this month.


Tyler Goodson has been busy since he was last seen playing football in an Iowa jersey. The 5-foot-10, 199-pound running back ran his last play as a Hawkeye in the Dec. 4 Big Ten Championship game at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. Iowa lost that game to Michigan, 42-3.

Goodson is now preparing for the NFL Draft. He participated in Iowa Football Pro Day on Monday and the NFL Scouting Combine from March 1-7. At both events, Goodson participated in several drills and interviews to show off his abilities on and off the field to NFL scouts.

“It’s been long, fun and stressful at times,” Goodson said at the Hansen Football Performance Center in Iowa City on Monday. “It’s really long. Like I said, not everyone has the opportunity to be in this position, so it’s definitely a blessing. I tried to have as much fun as possible.

“I’m honestly ready to get this over with,” Goodson added. “I can’t wait to see where I go, but it’s been fun.”

Before the NFL Combine, Goodson was in Frisco, Texas, training with Exos – a company specializing in sports performance.

Goodson said he worked with Exos for two months in preparation for the NFL Combine. He opted out of Iowa Football’s New Year’s Citrus Bowl game with Kentucky on Dec. 10.

“I wanted to play with my guys,” Goodson said. “I fought with them for three years. These guys, I love them. I will go to war for them anytime. It was just a business decision for me, if I wanted to risk injury and then not be able to compete in the combine or maybe even, depending on the injury, here at the pro day. It was definitely just a business decision.

According to NFL.com, Goodson’s prospect rating is 5.52, which means he should be a practice player or bench warmer.

Site reviewer Lance Zierlein wrote that Goodson dances excessively on the line of scrimmage, is unable to muster enough strength to cross contact, is an indecisive multi-stepper on inside zone runs, has average vision and doesn’t trust trail running, doesn’t place tacklers in blocks effectively enough, and doesn’t get much separation coming out of pattern breaks.

“[Goodson is a] runner with average height, below average athleticism and toughness to add yardage beyond what his offensive line creates for him,” Zierlein wrote. “Goodson played in Iowa’s high-density zonal running scheme but lacks elements such as vision and decision that are typically associated with successful zonal runners at the professional level. He rarely runs with authority or the will to create on his own through contact and doesn’t seem to have an explosive top speed to rely on. There aren’t any positional traits or skills that stand out enough to warrant more than a late look.

Goodson’s Next Gen Stats rating on NFL.com is 63. Next Gen Stats scores range from 50 to 100. Those between 50 and 65 are considered “below average” prospects. Scores for “good” and “elite” prospects range from 75 to 100.

Goodson ran the 40-yard sprint in 4.42 seconds at the NFL Combine. The time was the seventh fastest of all running backs posted at the event. About 30 RBs are participating in this year’s NFL Combine.

“TGood” also posted a vertical jump of 36.5 inches. He did not participate in the bench press, tri-cone shuttle, 20-yard shuttle or 60-yard shuttle drills.

“I think people focus on the [40-yard dash] a little too much,” Goodson said. “Football isn’t just a straight line. It’s all about how fast you can move in tight spaces. It’s good to see you have the breakaway speed, but again, you never just go running in a straight line.

Zierlein noted that one of Goodson’s strengths is his mobility and the way his feet glide. Zierlein also wrote that Goodson has adequate acceleration to the corner, quick footing to escape out the side door, open-field rotation that allows him to disappear from tacklers, and an ability to navigate routes out of the backfield. and to separate.

Goodson said his elevator pitches to NFL teams he was interviewed with often included his ability to catch passes, among other things.

“I’m a full back,” Goodson said. “I can play all downs, especially coming out of the backfield to catch the ball. That’s really my argument. It’s that simple. These days, it seems like running backs last longer in the league if they can catch the ball. I pride myself on catching the ball, so I think that will be a good factor for me at the next level.

Draftwire.com’s Jason Infante expects Goodson to be drafted in the fourth or fifth round of the 2022 NFL Draft, which runs from April 29 to May 1.

Goodson said he will watch this year’s NFL Draft with his family in Georgia.

“Now it’s really about meeting teams,” Goodson said. “Teams like to do private training. If a team contacts me for private training, I’ll be open if that’s what they want to see. But right now it’s all about meetings – making sure my mind is straight and I’m ready for those meetings. Then I’ll be back in Atlanta. I will train there and stay home for the draft with the family and enjoy it.

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